Varithena®

Varithena®

Varithena® is an FDA-approved, prescription medicine for varicose veins. It is used to treat problems in the great saphenous vein (GSV) system of the leg and tributary varicosities, including twisted (torturous) veins that cannot be accessed with a rigid laser fiber, veins with a range of diameters from small to large, and veins that have unsuccessfully been treated with other methods. Varithena® consists of an injectable foam (polidocanol) that effectively treats the most common symptoms of varicose veins, including aching, heaviness, throbbing, swelling, and itching. Varithena® also improves the appearance of varicose veins. Varithena® is a minimally invasive treatment, meaning it can be performed on an outpatient basis with minimal discomfort and no downtime. No incisions are needed, only a needle stick is employed to inject the solution into the vein.

Varithena diagram

How Varithena® works

Dr. Richter will administer the Varithena® foam into your vein via direct injection a butterfly Needle or through a tiny catheter. The foam is directed with the ultrasound probe to the areas the veins that need to be treated and irritates the inside of the veins making it seal shut. The body naturally reroutes blood through healthier veins close by. Your own body will reabsorb the vein over a period of time that can take up to a year. You may feel some leg discomfort or see some bruising around the injection site a few days to 2 weeks later depending on the size of the vein treated.

What results you can expect from Varithena®

Most patients report significant improvement in all of the symptoms mentioned above, and both doctors and patients report an improved vein appearance after treatment with Varithena®.

Who should not have Varithena®?

Patients who are allergic to polidocanol or who have thrombosis should not have Varithena®. In addition, please tell Dr. Richter if you have any of the following conditions:

  • Pregnancy
  • A history of arterial disease
  • Recent surgery or a long hospital stay
  • A history of thrombosis
  • Reduced mobility